Tag Archives: Sustainable

PERMACULTURE ** Design Principle #7 – Start small, figure out what works, then repeat with necessary modifications

hugelkultur bed, broccoli

Broccoli currently growing in hugelkultur bed

Following this principle:

  • Reduces gardener overwhelm
  • Saves time, energy and money in the long run
  • Gives a feeling of accomplishment as one section at a time of the garden and/or orchard becomes functional rather than having a huge unfinished project that may or may not work when it’s done

Following this principle requires: PATIENCE!

I believe I have mentioned that patience is not one of my gardening virtues so the application of this principle was a challenge for me! I wanted to do it all, vegetable and native plant gardens, food forest, edible landscaping, berms and swales, a pond, livestock, solar panels …  All of this I wanted done in my first year at Green Owl Gardens!

sheet mulch

I really wish I had used 1/2 inch aviary wire under all the lovely sheet mulch!

Here are a couple of examples of when I have and have not practiced this principle starting at the very beginning when I started work on the vegetable garden. We moved to Julian on December 1st, 2009. I felt like I was already a month behind in getting the vegetable garden prepped for spring planting so instead of gathering data and talking to neighbors I jumped right in and laid down 500 feet of chicken wire over the grass lawn. I then laid down flattened cardboard boxes to smother the lawn, some green clippings, a six inch “layer of straw, an inch or two of compost and another thick layer of straw. THEN I met my neighbor who gently informed me that the land I live on is heavily populated with gophers who will squeeze right through the regular one inch mesh chicken wire I had used.  I did not tear it all up and start over; I went into denial and hoped for the best and consequently my first year vegetable garden was overrun by gophers.

Since then I’ve been digging out the original chicken wire and experimenting with raised, sunken

sunken beds

My friend Alden helping to dig sunken beds in the vegetable garden

and hugelkultur garden beds diligently lining each of the new beds with ½ inch wire hardware cloth or ½ mesh aviary wire (which looks like chicken wire but with a ½ inch mesh).  What I’ve learned from redoing my beds I will now apply this spring when I work on expanding my developing food forest down in the orchard.

Remember -“Use small scale, intensive systems. Start at your doorstep with the smallest system that will do the job … then repeat it with variations” Toby Hemenway – Gaia’s Garden

PERMACULTURE ** Design Principle #6 – Make MINIMAL CHANGES to achieve MAXIMUM EFFECT when working to improve a system

pop-up sprinkler conversion

Chard and tomato plants benefitting from sprinkler to drip line conversion

This principle makes great time and energy saving sense, but first, before I could put it into practice I had to understand what was meant by a “system”. To understand the term “system” in a gardening context, it helps me to think of the human body and the integrated systems that keep it functioning.  The digestive, nervous and immune systems all work together to sustain one living organism. Gardens, orchards, neighborhoods and cities flourish when viewed as integrated living systems rather than isolated, separate, unconnected components.

After wrapping my brain around what a “system” was I started experimenting. Observation of those experiments made it possible to identify key leverage points. I then made a few changes to get the maximum benefit from each system. These changes altered how each system worked together to support the productivity of the whole garden. This is not a onetime deal. I’m always looking for ways to simplify, improve and streamline systems to create sustainable integrated gardens, fruit tree guilds and wild lands.

Pop-up sprinkler conversion

Pop-up sprinkler converted to drip line irrigation

Often, when moving to a new garden location the systems that have been installed before our arrival are not designed to support sustainable gardening efforts. This was the case when I converted the existing 660 square foot backyard lawn into a vegetable garden. The lawn had a conventional pop-up sprinkler system installed which sprayed precious water into the air to be carried away by evaporation while creating an unhappy environment for veggies that do not like wet leaves. Happily, through the UC Master Gardener program, I had a class on irrigation options. I discovered I could convert the existing sprinkler system to drip line irrigation. With limited expense, using the existing pipes and timer, I was able to revamp the system to meet the needs of my vegetable garden. Considering the effort and waste of installing a whole new irrigation system I was happy to make this relatively small change that had a big effect on the amount of water being used and the overall health of the vegetable garden.

Identifying systems, observing them and making minimal changes for maximum benefit has made gardening easier and more productive for me overall!

 

PERMACULTURE ** An adventure in lifestyle change…

lawn_irradication,organic gardening, raised bed gardening, permaculture, seed saving, growing heirloom vegetables, herb gardening, planting fruit trees, edible landscaping and water harvesting also garden art, mosaic, stained glass

February 5, 2010 Doing away with the backyard lawn!

Our journey towards living a more sustainable lifestyle started four years ago when my husband and I decided we wanted to live a little more off the grid. I was curious as to how much of our own food we could actually grow and I wanted to experiment with alternative energy. I was looking into solar hot water heaters and using solar panels to supply household electricity, as well as water harvesting techniques.

I was somewhat familiar with organic gardening practices, composting and the idea of using rain barrels but I hadn’t had a much long term success with any of it so I figured, since I was planning on doing something on a larger scale, I should learn a lot more about it. I did a bunch of research and discovered the term “permaculture”. While still living in a one bedroom apartment I started checking out books from the library and reading lots of articles on the internet. I decided that permaculture was the way I wanted to go when we finally found land somewhere. Once we bought our four and half acre property, permaculture design principles gave me a framework to work within that was both practical and in alignment with my wish to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

Without the permaculture design principles I would have been completely overwhelmed. I was about to begin gardening on a large scale, in a four season climate, in the mountains and it turned out that there was a lot of competition from hungry critters for just about everything I grew to eat. I could make lists of things I wish I’d known before and after we purchased land in the back country! I would do it all over again but I would be a lot more prepared and do more than a few things differently right from the beginning. At the very least I would know what questions to ask, questions I never thought of until after we moved.

So in an effort to both remind myself as well as share with others I’m doing a series of posts on 10 permaculture design principles based on what I’ve understood from the book Gaia’s Garden, A Guide to home-scale Permaculture by Toby Hemenway. When I use these principles I’m productive in a ways that are more sustainable for myself, others and the planet and I achieve an overall saner existence! I would love to hear from you about your experience  if you have started using these principles and if you haven’t yet I’d like to hear what questions you have. I invite you to subscribe and be part of discussion about what we are all doing to have an environmentally friendly sustainable lifestyle.